Steven Soderbergh compares filmmaking to sex

Steven Soderbergh compares filmmaking to sex

Steven Soderbergh says he makes movies like he makes love.

The 54-year-old director has had an acclaimed career in the movie business and his filmography includes acclaimed movies such as 1989's 'Sex, Lies, and Videotape', 1999's 'Erin Brockovich' and 2000's 'Ocean's Eleven'.

Soderbergh is very proud of when his films are well received but he has jokingly compared his successes to when he gives his wife Jules Asner pleasure between the sheets, it's all accidental.

Discussing his work, he said: "I view it the way I view sex. If I accidentally give someone else pleasure during it, I'm fine with that."

Soderbergh's latest movie is crime romp 'Logan Lucky' which was written by Rebecca Blunt and follows two brothers, Jimmy (Channing Tatum) and Clyde (Adam Driver), who attempt to pull off a heist during a NASCAR race in North Carolina.

The film also stars James Bond actor Daniel Craig, Seth McFarlane and Katie Holmes and Soderbergh admits he worked hard to get Craig on board, knowing how much his 007 persona follows him around.

Speaking to The Guardian newspaper, Soderbergh said: "He's the Roman candle of the piece. Knowing how much pressure he is under, I told him, 'I don't care how you look and you don't have to do any press if you don't want to.' I think his sense of freedom is palpable in the film - it seemed like he really enjoyed being able to just cut loose, tear up the screen and split."

'Logan Lucky' has been praised by critics for its humour, tight script and oddball characters and Soderbergh admits he made a conscious decision to step away from serious screen projects after the release of 'Che', his 2008 biopic about Argentine Marxist revolutionary Ernesto "Che" Guevara which starred Benicio del Toro in the title role.

He said: "When I came out the other end of it, my interest in making serious movies, important movies or award-worthy movies just disappeared. I suppose I could have made a sort of Michael Mann version of 'The Informant', but that's not what I wanted. I was very conscious that we turn it into a dark comedy. And 'Contagion', I didn't look at it as a serious drama - I looked at it as a horror movie. There's a freedom in that, in not really caring whether you're taken seriously. I want to just be engaged by what I'm doing moment to moment. I think you can tell, when you look at 'Logan Lucky', that it's made by somebody who is very engaged."

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